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SAVE
NADIA HABIB


STONY BROOK U
DREAM ACT STUDENT
TO BE DEPORTED
9/29 UNLESS
'WE THE PEOPLE' CONVINCE THE U.S. GOVERNMENT HOW
WRONG THAT IS!

1st STEP:
SIGN THE PETITION
action.dreamactivist.org/nadia/

Nadia is a junior honor roll student at SBU. The funny thing about the photo of her above is that it was taken while she was doing the photography for JHALAK 2011, the annual Bengalis Unite (BU) cultural show. She wasn't covering the show for BU, she was doing it because she wanted to see You Tube sensation Jus Reign, and she figured going to the show might give her the opportunity to try to reconnect with her Bengali culture.

Nadia had gone to a BU meeting during her freshman year but hadn't joined because she felt so out of place. Although she was born in Bangladesh, she hadn't been in the country of her birth since she was 18 months old. Her parents had wanted her to be like everyone else so she grew up speaking English, knowing just some smatterings of Bengali, living the life of a typical American kid. She felt ignorant among the BU students because when it came to the country of her birth, she was pretty clueless. 

I remember her excitement when she got a ticket to Bruno Mars, the #1 ranked American pop star performing at SB last spring. High pitched, jumping up and down, excitedly screaming, "I can't believe I'm going. I can't believe I'm going. Bruno Mars. I'm going to see Bruno Mars. I'm so excited. I can't believe I'm going to see Bruno Mars! I'm so excited." I think she said "I'm so excited" about a hundred times that day.

Now, less than two years after feeling out of place at that BU meeting, the only country she really knows wants to send her back to what to her is a foreign country. Why? Although her father had his green card when she came here, due to an immigration judge's clerical error, she and her mother don't have theirs. Although her parents have been dealing with Immigration about the problem for 11 years now, INS is simply saying "oh well, too late." Not wanting to worry her, Nadia's parents didn't tell her she was still undocumented until she was a senior in high school applying to colleges.

Although President Obama has said the INS should hold off on deporting Dream Act students, the INS has said the rules are not in place yet and the old rules still apply. Nadia and her mother have already been told - come to the hearing with 50 pounds of your belongings already packed and ready to go.

So on Thursday at 11am, unless all of the phone calls and petition signatures her friends and fellow students are gathering for her work; unless SB University's appeal, through Tonjonita Johnson, the Deputy to the President, works; unless the special immigration specialist provided for her by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand works - another immigration judge could make another mistake and decide to send her back.

Does it make any sense to send this well educated, bright young woman who is American in every way save the paperwork that says she is a citizen back to a country that is as foreign to her as any other country in the world except the one she calls home? 

Last year we wrote articles about the Dream Act and another SB student fearful of the same thing happening to her. Nadia's father came from a wealthy landowning family in Bangladesh, but wealth doesn't protect anyone in a country where politics and violence are inseparable. College educated, he chose freedom, the freedom to drive a taxicab in NYC. The father of the undocumented student we wrote about last year had been a college educated journalist in China, jailed during the Cultural Revolution for writing against the policies of the government. He gave up his profession to work in a Chinese restaurant in NYC.

Does anyone see a pattern there? Both sets of parents are the best kind of immigrants America could have. They didn't come because they thought the streets were paved with gold. They came to give their children the hope and freedom their country couldn't. Unlike many native born Americans who don't even know what is in the First Amendment, those parents truly understood and believe in the American ideals of our Bill of Rights.

2nd STEP 1st THING MON MORNING
CALL DHS and ICE

1. Call DHS Janet Napolitano @ 202 282 8495
2. Call ICE John Morton @ 202 732 3000 

Here is Nadia talking about her ordeal and being scared. Below are articles about the Dream Act and Nadia.

Please help!

 

 

by Ja Young
Alumni Editor, AA E-Zine
25 Sept 2011

The Dream Act
http://www.aaezine.org/articles/vol23/23N3DreamAct.shtml

The All American Kid Next Door Who Lives In Fear
http://www.aaezine.org/articles/vol23/23N3MeiLingDreamAct.shtml

Nadia Habib
http://threevillage.patch.com/articles/stony-brook-student-mother-face-deportation#comments

Nadia Habib
http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2011/09/23/queens-mother-daughter-hoping-to-avoid-deportation-to-bangladesh/

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